OUR STORY

300 YEAR
OLD HISTORY
our

More than 1000 years ago, it was a monastery, but for over three centuries now San Leonardo has served as the residence of the Marchesi Guerrieri Gonzaga family, its proud custodians. Today, the San Leonardo estate is a garden of vineyards and roses, protected by the massive barrier of the Alps, which blunt the force of the cold northern winds

More than 1000 years ago, it was a monastery, but for over three centuries now San Leonardo has served as the residence of the Marchesi Guerrieri Gonzaga family, its proud custodians. Today, the San Leonardo estate is a garden of vineyards and roses, protected by the massive barrier of the Alps, which blunt the force of the cold northern winds, while the valley floor benefits from, and in turn releases, warmth from nearby Lake Garda. The tenuta remains an antique world, in which winemaking practices, still uncompromisingly artisanal, yield wines that are true gems of Italy’s wine tradition, marked by freshness, harmony, and an innate elegance.

while the valley floor benefits from, and in turn releases, warmth from nearby Lake Garda. The tenuta remains an antique world, in which winemaking practices, still uncompromisingly artisanal, yield wines that are true gems of Italy’s wine tradition, marked by freshness, harmony, and an innate elegance.

Famiglia Guerrieri Gonzaga San Leonardo
The Guerrieri \A Gonzaga family

FAMILY the

The soul of San Leonardo is embodied in the Guerrieri Gonzaga family, winegrowers here as far back as the 18th century. They have been intimately involved in every aspect of the estate throughout its long and fascinating history, and its traditions infuse every corner of the property. Marchese Carlo’s father, a passionate winemaker, first reorganised the estate between the late 18th and early 19th centuries. But Carlo was the family’s first true winemaker: his love for great wines led him to concentrate on San Leonardo almost all his efforts and time over fifty years. That passionate love for the vine and its wine he passed on in turn to his son Anselmo, who today directs the family winery, with every decision animated by that love for an estate so beloved by so many generations of his family.

From warriors to vignerons

The family motto is “Belli ac Pacis Amator” (lover of war and peace) and it may be difficult to imagine it today, but once upon a time, the Terzi – the family’s original surname – men were warriors. Niccolò, son of Ottobono, was even called “The Warrior” for the valour shown in many battles. In 1506 the surname was extended to include that of Gonzaga, to show the gratitude of Marchese Francesco, Lord of Mantua.

Only in 1894, however, did the Guerrieri Gonzaga family take up regular residence in Trento, when Marchese Tullo, grandfather of Carlo Guerrieri Gonzaga, married Gemma de Gresti, whose family had owned the Tenuta San Leonardo for almost two centuries. It was their son Anselmo who cast a more business-like eye on the property and who introduced significant changes, the fruit of his passion for winemaking.

Marchese Tullo Guerrieri Gonzaga
Marchese Tullo Guerrieri Gonzaga
Marchesi Guerrieri Gonzaga San Leonardo
Marchese Carlo and Marchese Anselmo Guerrieri Gonzaga

The family’s first real winemaker, however, was Carlo Guerrieri Gonzaga, his training directed not only by what was required to personally manage the family agricultural concern, but above all by a lively curiosity for the world’s great wines, with Bordeaux in first place. This interest led to his decision to study oenology in Lausanne, and to deepen his knowledge with research trips to France and Tuscany. It was precisely here, on the San Guido property, that he began the long, profitable partnership with Marquis Mario Incisa della Rocchetta, who revealed all the secrets of the Bordeaux blend to Carlo and became his “oenological godfather” to all intents and purposes.

Today, Marquis Carlo has spent nearly fifty years dedicating almost all of his time, energy, and attention to the Tenuta San Leonardo. For some years his son Anselmo has been fully involved as well with the winery, like his father passionately committed to the Trentino area, to its cultural and physical landscapes, to its distinctive fragrances.

PEOPLE the

In the ancient borgo of San Leonardo live families who from generation to generation have passed down their knowledge of the earth and the art of working it. Many of those who work with the Guerrieri Gonzaga family in the creation of the estate's

In the ancient borgo of San Leonardo live families who from generation to generation have passed down their knowledge of the earth and the art of working it. Many of those who work with the Guerrieri Gonzaga family in the creation of the estate's wines were actually born and raised in San Leonardo. They are the ones who determine its shape and identity, and one feels that sense of harmony and belonging as soon as one passes through the gates of the tenuta.

wines were actually born and raised in San Leonardo. They are the ones who determine its shape and identity, and one feels that sense of harmony and belonging as soon as one passes through the gates of the tenuta.

Marchese Carlo and Marchese Anselmo with the “extended family” of San Leonardo
Gemma de Gresti San Leonardo
Marchesa Gemma de Gresti \A Guerrieri Gonzaga

GEMMA
GRESTI
de

Marchesa Gemma De Gresti, who married Tullo Guerrieri Gonzaga in 1892, was born at San Leonardo in 1873. A person of sterling moral principles and sensitivity, she dedicated most of her brief life to works of charity. During the First World War, she expended great efforts to locate and return to their country the thousands of Italian prisoners of war who had been scattered into various concentration camps in Russia. In the immediate aftermath of the war, she lent her efforts to the reconstruction of the Trentino region, helping to supply hospitals, schools, and nursery schools. She was also involved in the creation of the Campana dei Caduti di Rovereto (Memorial Bell to the Fallen) and in many other projects. In recognition of her contributions, the International Red Cross bestowed upon her its highest award, the Gold Medal for Humanitarian Values. She continued her commitment right up to her death in 1928; she now rests in the crypt of San Leonardo.